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Big motivation hides behind ‘Small Data’

“Small Data: The Tiny Clues that Uncover Huge Trends” by Martin Lindstrom, 2016, Picador, $16, 244 pages. It’s always the little things. A chocolate on the pillow or slippers beneath a turned-down bed. Stickers for a customer’s kids. A lagniappe in the box to make a baker’s dozen: all things to ensure a speedy return of buyer or client.

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‘Rich20Something’ inspiring, but worthy of caution

“Rich20Something: Ditch Your Average Job, Start an Epic Business, and Score the Life You Want” by Daniel DiPiazza, 2017, TarcherPerigee, $24, 281 pages. Your paycheck was a lot smaller than you thought it would be. How irritating: After taxes and other deductions, you’re making a pittance for your work. How unfair. This isn’t the way it was when your parents started out!

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Think you’re enjoying your weekends? Guess again

“The Weekend Effect” by Katrina Onstad, 2017, HarperOne, $25.99, 304 pages
Zzzzzzzzzip. That was the sound of your last weekend as it passed by. But it probably doesn’t matter, anyhow: It was packed with work, to-do’s, obligations, kids sports and more work. Sometimes, you wonder why you even bother. You might as well just go to the office.

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‘Broke’ author on quest to destroy financial illiteracy

“Broke Millennial” by Erin Lowry, 2017, Tarcher Perigee, $15, 276 pages. You are so busted. And that’s never a good thing in relationships, recreation or in finances. Especially in finances. When your wallet is empty, so are both calendar and stomach, but what can you do when even the word “money” scares you?

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Book review: How can ‘Superfandom’ work for you?

“Superfandom: How Our Obsessions Are Changing What We Buy and Who We Are,” by Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron M. Glazer, 2017, W.W. Norton, $27.95, 336 pages. Collect them all. These three words put a smile on every marketer’s face and fear in every parent’s heart. “Collect them all,” as you may remember, was kid-code for “bug your parents until they buy stuff,” making you the envy of everyone in third grade. Your goal now: to capture that buyer’s obsession at the level you’ll see in “Superfandom” by Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron M. Glazer.

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Book review: The hard work behind the top dog

“Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?” by Alyssa Mastromonaco (with Lauren Oyler), 2017, Twelve, $27, 256 pages
Your boss is a VIP: a very important person. Nothing gets done without approval from the executive suite and nothing is unnoticed. There’s a finger on the pulse of your company at all times, which is probably how The Boss got to the top. And in the new book “Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?” by Alyssa Mastromonaco (with Lauren Oyler), you’ll see what it’s like to work for a guy who’s more than just the president of a corporation. Born in the mid-1970s and raised in small-town Vermont, Mastromonaco says she was independent early on and marched to her own drummer, but wasn’t particularly political unless it was “cool.” Nevertheless, one summer between college semesters, she interned for Bernie Sanders and discovered what she wanted to do with her life.

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“Extreme Teams” useful but hard to implement

“Extreme Teams” 2017, by Robert Bruce Shaw, Amacom, $27.95, 247 pages
No man is an island. He (or she) can’t do everything alone. We need help sometimes; a group of support, a posse with our best interests in mind. We often need a team to get things done, and in the new book, “Extreme Teams,” by Robert Bruce Shaw, you might learn how to assemble your best. At natural food store chain Whole Foods, employees work differently.

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Enjoy being ‘Organized Enough’

“Organized Enough” by Amanda Sullivan, 2017, DaCapo Lifelong, $16.99, 229 pages
You know exactly where Monday’s report is. That, of course, doesn’t mean anybody else could find it. You put that report in a safe place in your office, which is organized to work for you. But is it really organized, or is it just a mess? Admit it: it’s probably the latter and nobody’s perfect, but with “Organized Enough” by Amanda Sullivan, you might find a perfect solution.

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‘Why Time Flies’ will show you a good time

“Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation” by Alan Burdick, 2017, Simon & Schuster, $28
Your last vacation was really fun. Those seven days felt like 10 minutes. And then you were back to work, where 10 minutes can seem like seven days. Why is that? How come enjoyable things whiz by fast and why do you wake up seconds before the alarm goes off?