Who Thought This Was a Good Idea (1)

Book review: The hard work behind the top dog

“Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?” by Alyssa Mastromonaco (with Lauren Oyler), 2017, Twelve, $27, 256 pages
Your boss is a VIP: a very important person. Nothing gets done without approval from the executive suite and nothing is unnoticed. There’s a finger on the pulse of your company at all times, which is probably how The Boss got to the top. And in the new book “Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?” by Alyssa Mastromonaco (with Lauren Oyler), you’ll see what it’s like to work for a guy who’s more than just the president of a corporation. Born in the mid-1970s and raised in small-town Vermont, Mastromonaco says she was independent early on and marched to her own drummer, but wasn’t particularly political unless it was “cool.” Nevertheless, one summer between college semesters, she interned for Bernie Sanders and discovered what she wanted to do with her life.

0311-ta-extreme

“Extreme Teams” useful but hard to implement

“Extreme Teams” 2017, by Robert Bruce Shaw, Amacom, $27.95, 247 pages
No man is an island. He (or she) can’t do everything alone. We need help sometimes; a group of support, a posse with our best interests in mind. We often need a team to get things done, and in the new book, “Extreme Teams,” by Robert Bruce Shaw, you might learn how to assemble your best. At natural food store chain Whole Foods, employees work differently.

organized_enough

Enjoy being ‘Organized Enough’

“Organized Enough” by Amanda Sullivan, 2017, DaCapo Lifelong, $16.99, 229 pages
You know exactly where Monday’s report is. That, of course, doesn’t mean anybody else could find it. You put that report in a safe place in your office, which is organized to work for you. But is it really organized, or is it just a mess? Admit it: it’s probably the latter and nobody’s perfect, but with “Organized Enough” by Amanda Sullivan, you might find a perfect solution.

0211-ta-book_review

‘Why Time Flies’ will show you a good time

“Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation” by Alan Burdick, 2017, Simon & Schuster, $28
Your last vacation was really fun. Those seven days felt like 10 minutes. And then you were back to work, where 10 minutes can seem like seven days. Why is that? How come enjoyable things whiz by fast and why do you wake up seconds before the alarm goes off?

0114-ta-rayjoan

‘Ray & Joan’ hints at mystery behind power couple

By Terri Schlichenmeyer
“Ray & Joan” by Lisa Napoli, Dutton, 353 pages, $27. To go. Whoever put those two delicious words together really knew what they were doing: Order your food, ask for it “to go,” save yourself time and eat wherever you want. You might not even have to get out of the car. Yes, “to go” are magic words but, as in the new book “Ray and Joan” by Lisa Napoli, there are still things you can’t take with you when you do.

1126-rh-healthy_workplace

Healthy employees are happier, more focused

There’s something going around the office this month. It appears to be a cold; half the staff is sniffling, the other half is coughing, everybody’s sluggish, and you’re not feeling so well yourself. Will this affect your business? Maybe, but in “The Healthy Workplace” by Leigh Stringer, you’ll find ways to minimize it next time.

1112-rh-bookreviewlet_me_ou

Conquer fear, unlock your best ideas

Your mind is a concrete block. Behind it, you’re pretty sure there are ideas — great ones, perhaps — but freeing them, well, good luck. You’re stuck, your brain is stuck, your career is stuck, and you wish you could get out of your own way so you can move ahead. So read “Let Me Out” by Peter Himmelman, and break through the wall.

1023-rh-bookreviewstrangers

Stark introduces ‘The Art of Small Talk’

You had a little talk with one of your employees last week. Her client list has almost no action and few new prospects on it lately, and that’s no good. She blames the economy, says it’s rough out there, and while you know that’s true, you suspect there’s more to the issue: She’s stagnated. With the new book “When Strangers Meet” by Kio Stark, she’ll get back her gift of gab.

1009-rh-bookreviewfightclub

Author ‘pulls no punches’ on workplace discrimination

Nobody just handed you your job. No, you had to strike fast and scratch up a decent résumé that packed a wallop. You knew there were other clock-punchers who wanted that job, too, and you were determined to beat them all. Turns out, though, that the work practically knocks you out every day, but in the new book “Feminist Fight Club” by Jessica Bennett, there are ways to attack your dissatisfaction.